No players meet the search conditions

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no players meet the search conditions

ANY returns true if any of the subquery values meet the condition. Solution: The query will search for records in column 'Name' which will. He says this several times when we meet at the Guildford offices of Hello . planetary conditions rather than hostile aliens or other players. that meet the criteria you've set, sort your items, limit the records displayed, and label your column headers without touching the data source.

Players with a maximum age if you wish to focus on signing young playersor a minimum age if you are looking for experienced players, perhaps for tutoring. Players who have a certain preferred foot if, say, you are looking for a winger who will stay wide and so will need to play on the side of his stronger foot, or an inside forward who will cut inside and so would benefit from playing on the opposite side to his stronger foot.

Alternatively, you may want a two-footed attacking player who could be more dangerous and unpredictable when on the ball. Players who are transfer listed and therefore available at a cheaper price, or players who are listed for loan if you are looking for temporary, cheap loan transfersperhaps from clubs in a higher division. Players whose contacts have expired or who are unattached, on non-contracts or on amateur contracts and so can be signed on free transfersparticularly if you manage a small club with little or no transfer budget.

Players who are on a youth contract and so can be offered a contract immediately, unless they have already provisionally agreed a professional contract, with compensation paid to their club if you sign the player.

Players whose contracts are expiring soon and so may be available for free on an end of contract agreement or alternatively for a cheaper price if bought before their contract expires.

You can save a particular set of search conditions for future use by selecting Save Current Filter from the Filter Options drop-down. Quick Search You can also use the Quick Search button to more easily search for particular types of players. This provides search templates for first team players, replacement players, backup players and hot prospects that work in a similar way to the identically named player assignment templates discussed in the Scouting Assignments guide.

Excluding Players The below checkboxes on the Show Filters drop-down can be used to show or exclude players from the list. Show Realistic transfers, realistic fee paying loans, realistic regular loans — Ticking these means that players who are not likely to be interested in a full transfer or loan transfer or whose clubs are not likely to want to sell or loan are not included in the list.

However, these filters are not perfect and may prevent some potentially available and interested players from being displayed, although such players are likely to be particularly costly in terms of both their transfer fee and wage demands, so filtering them out can help you to keep your spending at a reasonable level. The outermost lines that make up the length are called the doubles sidelines.

These are the boundaries used when doubles is being played. The lines to the inside of the doubles sidelines are the singles sidelines and are used as boundaries in singles play. The area between a doubles sideline and the nearest singles sideline is called the doubles alley, which is considered playable in doubles play. The line that runs across the center of a player's side of the court is called the service line because the serve must be delivered into the area between the service line and the net on the receiving side.

Despite its name, this is not where a player legally stands when making a serve. The boxes this center line creates are called the service boxes; depending on a player's position, he or she will have to hit the ball into one of these when serving. Point tennis The players or teams start on opposite sides of the net.

One player is designated the server, and the opposing player is the receiver. The choice to be server or receiver in the first game and the choice of ends is decided by a coin toss before the warm-up starts.

Service alternates game by game between the two players or teams. For each point, the server starts behind the baseline, between the center mark and the sideline. The receiver may start anywhere on their side of the net. When the receiver is ready, the server will servealthough the receiver must play to the pace of the server. In a legal service, the ball travels over the net without touching it and into the diagonally opposite service box.

If the ball hits the net but lands in the service box, this is a let or net service, which is void, and the server retakes that serve. The player can serve any number of let services in a point and they are always treated as voids and not as faults. A fault is a serve that falls long or wide of the service box, or does not clear the net.

There is also a "foot fault", which occurs when a player's foot touches the baseline or an extension of the center mark before the ball is hit. If the second service is also a fault, the server double faults, and the receiver wins the point.

However, if the serve is in, it is considered a legal service. A legal service starts a rally, in which the players alternate hitting the ball across the net. A legal return consists of the player or team hitting the ball before it has bounced twice or hit any fixtures except the net, provided that it still falls in the server's court. A player or team cannot hit the ball twice in a row. The ball must travel past the net into the other players' court. A ball that hits the net during a rally is still considered a legal return as long as it crosses into the opposite side of the court.

The first player or team to fail to make a legal return loses the point. The server then moves to the other side of the service line at the start of a new point.

For software term, see Breakpoint. Game, set, match Game A game consists of a sequence of points played with the same player serving. A game is won by the first player to have won at least four points in total and at least two points more than the opponent. The running score of each game is described in a manner peculiar to tennis: If at least three points have been scored by each player, making the player's scores equal at 40 apiece, the score is not called out as "", but rather as "deuce".

If at least three points have been scored by each side and a player has one more point than his opponent, the score of the game is "advantage" for the player in the lead. During informal games, "advantage" can also be called "ad in" or "van in" when the serving player is ahead, and "ad out" or "van out" when the receiving player is ahead. The scoreboard of a match between Andy Roddick and Cyril Saulnier. The score of a tennis game during play is always read with the serving player's score first.

no players meet the search conditions

In tournament play, the chair umpire calls the point count e. At the end of a game, the chair umpire also announces the winner of the game and the overall score.

Set A set consists of a sequence of games played with service alternating between games, ending when the count of games won meets certain criteria. Typically, a player wins a set by winning at least six games and at least two games more than the opponent.

If one player has won six games and the opponent five, an additional game is played. If the leading player wins that game, the player wins the set 7—5. If the trailing player wins the game tying the set 6—6 a tie-break is played. A tie-break, played under a separate set of rules, allows one player to win one more game and thus the set, to give a final set score of 7—6.

A "love" set means that the loser of the set won zero games, colloquially termed a 'jam donut' in the USA. The final score in sets is always read with the winning player's score first, e. Match A match consists of a sequence of sets.

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The outcome is determined through a best of three or five sets system. On the professional circuit, men play best-of-five-set matches at all four Grand Slam tournaments, Davis Cup, and the final of the Olympic Games and best-of-three-set matches at all other tournaments, while women play best-of-three-set matches at all tournaments. The first player to win two sets in a best-of-three, or three sets in a best-of-five, wins the match. In these cases, sets are played indefinitely until one player has a two-game lead, leading to some remarkably long matches.

In tournament play, the chair umpire announces the end of the match with the well-known phrase "Game, set, match" followed by the winning person's or team's name. Special point terms Game point A game point occurs in tennis whenever the player who is in the lead in the game needs only one more point to win the game. The terminology is extended to sets set pointmatches match pointand even championships championship point. For example, if the player who is serving has a score of love, the player has a triple game point triple set point, etc.

Game points, set points, and match points are not part of official scoring and are not announced by the chair umpire in tournament play.

Break point A break point occurs if the receiver, not the serverhas a chance to win the game with the next point. Break points are of particular importance because serving is generally considered advantageous, with servers being expected to win games in which they are serving. A receiver who has one score of 30—40 or advantagetwo score of 15—40 or three score of love consecutive chances to win the game has break point, double break point or triple break point, respectively.

If the receiver does, in fact, win their break point, the game is awarded to the receiver, and the receiver is said to have converted their break point. If the receiver fails to win their break point it is called a failure to convert.

no players meet the search conditions

Winning break points, and thus the game, is also referred to as breaking serve, as the receiver has disrupted, or broken the natural advantage of the server. If in the following game the previous server also wins a break point it is referred to as breaking back. Except where tie-breaks apply, at least one break of serve is required to win a set. Rule variations See also: Types of tennis match No ad From 'No advantage'.

Scoring method created by Jimmy Van Alen. The first player or doubles team to win four points wins the game, regardless of whether the player or team is ahead by two points. When the game score reaches three points each, the receiver chooses which side of the court advantage court or deuce court the service is to be delivered on the seventh and game-deciding point.

A pro set is first to 8 or 10 games by a margin of two games, instead of first to 6 games. A point tie-break is usually played when the score is 8—8 or 10— These are often played with no-ad scoring. Match tie-break This is sometimes played instead of a third set.

A match tie-break also called super tie-break is played like a regular tie-break, but the winner must win ten points instead of seven. Fast4 Fast4 is a shortened format that offers a "fast" alternative, with four points, four games and four rules: Another, however informal, tennis format is called Canadian doubles. This involves three players, with one person playing a doubles team. He may also forfeit his innings before it has started. The side which scores the most runs wins the match.

If both sides score the same number of runs, the match is tied. However, the match may run out of time before the innings have all been completed. In this case, the match is drawn.

An over consists of six balls bowled, excluding wides and no-balls. Consecutive overs are delivered from opposite ends of the pitch. A bowler may not bowl two consecutive overs. Runs are scored when the two batsmen run to each other's end of the pitch. Several runs can be scored from one ball. A boundary is marked around the edge of the field of play.

If the ball is hit into or past this boundary, four runs are scored, or six runs if the ball doesn't hit the ground before crossing the boundary. The ball comes into play when the bowler begins his run up, and becomes dead when all the action from that ball is over. Once the ball is dead, no runs can be scored and no batsmen can be dismissed. The ball becomes dead for a number of reasons, most commonly when a batsman is dismissed, when a boundary is hit, or when the ball has finally settled with the bowler or wicketkeeper.

A ball can be a no-ball for several reasons: A no-ball adds one run to the batting team's score, in addition to any other runs which are scored off it, and the batsman can't be dismissed off a no-ball except by being run out, hitting the ball twice, or obstructing the field.

An umpire calls a ball "wide" if, in his or her opinion, the ball is so wide of the batsman and the wicket that he could not hit it with the bat playing a normal cricket shot. A wide adds one run to the batting team's score, in addition to any other runs which are scored off it, and the batsman can't be dismissed off a wide except by being run out or stumped, by hitting his wicket, or obstructing the field.

Bye and leg bye. If a ball that is not a wide passes the striker and runs are scored, they are called byes. If a ball hits the striker but not the bat and runs are scored, they are called leg-byes. However, leg-byes cannot be scored if the striker is neither attempting a stroke nor trying to avoid being hit. Byes and leg-byes are credited to the team's but not the batsman's total. In cricket, a substitute may be brought on for an injured fielder.

However, a substitute may not bat, bowl or act as captain. The original player may return if he has recovered. Batsman's innings ; Runners A batsman who becomes unable to run may have a runner, who completes the runs while the batsman continues batting. The use of runners is not permitted in international cricket under the current playing conditions. Alternatively, a batsman may retire hurt or ill, and may return later to resume his innings if he recovers.

Practice on the field. There may be no batting or bowling practice on the pitch during the match. Practice is permitted on the outfield during the intervals and before the day's play starts and after the day's play has ended. Bowlers may only practice bowling and have trial run-ups if the umpires are of the view that it would waste no time and does not damage the ball or the pitch. The keeper is a designated player from the bowling side allowed to stand behind the stumps of the batsman.

They are the only fielder allowed to wear gloves and external leg guards. A fielder is any of the eleven cricketers from the bowling side. Fielders are positioned to field the ball, to stop runs and boundaries, and to get batsmen out by catching or running them out. Dismissal cricket Laws 29 to 31 cover the main mechanics of how a batsman may be dismissed.

The wicket is down. Several methods of dismissal occur when the wicket is put down. This means that the wicket is hit by the ball, or the batsman, or the hand in which a fielder is holding the ball, and at least one bail is removed; if both bails have already been previously removed, one stump must be removed from the ground. The batsmen can be run out or stumped if they are out of their ground. A batsman is in his ground if any part of him or his bat is on the ground behind the popping crease.

If both batsman are in the middle of the pitch when a wicket is put down, the batsman closer to that end is out. If the fielders believe a batsman is out, they may ask the umpire "How's That? The umpire then decides whether the batsman is out. Strictly speaking, the fielding side must appeal for all dismissals, including obvious ones such as bowled. However, a batsman who is obviously out will normally leave the pitch without waiting for an appeal or a decision from the umpire. In addition to these 9 methods, a batsman may retire out, which is covered in Law Of these, caught is generally the most common, followed by bowled, leg before wicket, run out and stumped.

The other forms of dismissal are very rare.

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A batsman is out if his wicket is put down by a ball delivered by the bowler. It is irrelevant whether the ball has touched the bat, glove, or any part of the batsman before going on to put down the wicket, though it may not touch another player or an umpire before doing so. If a ball hits the bat or the hand holding the bat and is then caught by the opposition within the field of play before the ball bounces, then the batsman is out. Hit the ball twice. If a batsman hits the ball twice, other than for the sole purpose of protecting his wicket or with the consent of the opposition, he is out.

If, after the bowler has entered his delivery stride and while the ball is in play, a batsman puts his wicket down by his bat or his body he is out. The striker is also out hit wicket if he puts his wicket down by his bat or his body in setting off for a first run. Leg before wicket LBW. If the ball hits the batsman without first hitting the bat, but would have hit the wicket if the batsman was not there, and the ball does not pitch on the leg side of the wicket, the batsman will be out.

However, if the ball strikes the batsman outside the line of the off-stump, and the batsman was attempting to play a stroke, he is not out.